How to nslookup using cmd

Posted on

Performing an NSLookup using the Command Prompt (CMD) is a fundamental networking tool used to query the Domain Name System (DNS) and retrieve information about domain names, IP addresses, and other DNS records. NSLookup, short for Name Server Lookup, allows users to troubleshoot DNS-related issues, verify DNS configurations, and gather information about DNS records for a given domain. In this guide, we'll explore various aspects of using NSLookup in CMD, providing step-by-step instructions and explanations for each aspect.

1. Opening the Command Prompt:

To begin using NSLookup in CMD, you first need to open the Command Prompt. CMD is a command-line interface provided by Windows operating systems that allows users to execute commands and perform various system tasks. To open the Command Prompt, follow these steps:

  • Press the Windows key to open the Start menu.
  • Type "cmd" into the search bar.
  • Click on "Command Prompt" in the search results to open the CMD window.

Alternatively, you can press Win + R to open the Run dialog, type "cmd," and press Enter.

2. Understanding NSLookup Syntax:

NSLookup commands follow a specific syntax that consists of the command itself followed by optional parameters and arguments. The basic syntax for using NSLookup in CMD is as follows:

nslookup [options] [domain]

Where:

  • "nslookup" is the command itself.
  • "[options]" are optional parameters that modify the behavior of the command.
  • "[domain]" is the domain name or IP address you want to query.

3. Querying Domain Names:

One of the most common uses of NSLookup is to query domain names and retrieve information about their associated IP addresses and DNS records. To query a domain name using NSLookup in CMD, follow these steps:

  • In the Command Prompt window, type the following command and press Enter:
nslookup example.com

Replace "example.com" with the domain name you want to query.

  • NSLookup will display the results of the query, including the domain's canonical name, IP address, and other DNS records such as MX (Mail Exchange) and NS (Name Server) records.

4. Retrieving IP Addresses:

NSLookup can also be used to retrieve the IP address associated with a domain name. This is useful for verifying DNS configurations and troubleshooting network connectivity issues. To retrieve the IP address of a domain name using NSLookup in CMD, follow these steps:

  • In the Command Prompt window, type the following command and press Enter:
nslookup example.com

Replace "example.com" with the domain name you want to query.

  • NSLookup will display the IP address(es) associated with the domain name, along with other DNS information.

5. Reverse DNS Lookup:

In addition to querying domain names to retrieve IP addresses, NSLookup can also perform reverse DNS lookups to retrieve domain names associated with an IP address. This is useful for identifying the hostname of a given IP address. To perform a reverse DNS lookup using NSLookup in CMD, follow these steps:

  • In the Command Prompt window, type the following command and press Enter:
nslookup <IP address>

Replace "" with the IP address you want to query.

  • NSLookup will display the domain name(s) associated with the specified IP address, if available.

6. Verbose Output and Debugging:

NSLookup provides options for generating more verbose output and enabling debugging to troubleshoot DNS-related issues. These options can provide additional information about DNS queries, responses, and server communications. To enable verbose output and debugging in NSLookup in CMD, follow these steps:

  • In the Command Prompt window, type the following command and press Enter:
nslookup -debug example.com

Replace "example.com" with the domain name you want to query.

  • NSLookup will display verbose output and debugging information, including details about the DNS query process, server responses, and any errors encountered.

7. Specifying DNS Servers:

By default, NSLookup uses the DNS servers configured on your system to perform DNS queries. However, you can specify alternative DNS servers to use for querying domain names using NSLookup. This can be useful for testing DNS configurations and troubleshooting DNS-related issues. To specify DNS servers in NSLookup in CMD, follow these steps:

  • In the Command Prompt window, type the following command and press Enter:
nslookup example.com <DNS server>

Replace "example.com" with the domain name you want to query, and "" with the IP address of the DNS server you want to use.

  • NSLookup will send the DNS query to the specified DNS server and display the results accordingly.

8. Querying Specific DNS Record Types:

In addition to retrieving basic DNS information such as IP addresses and canonical names, NSLookup can also query specific DNS record types to retrieve more detailed information about a domain. Common DNS record types include A (Address), AAAA (IPv6 Address), MX (Mail Exchange), NS (Name Server), and TXT (Text). To query specific DNS record types using NSLookup in CMD, follow these steps:

  • In the Command Prompt window, type the following command and press Enter:
nslookup -type=<record type> example.com

Replace "" with the desired DNS record type (e.g., "A", "MX", "NS"), and "example.com" with the domain name you want to query.

  • NSLookup will display the specified DNS record type(s) associated with the domain name, if available.

9. Using Interactive Mode:

NSLookup offers an interactive mode that allows users to perform multiple queries within the same session without exiting the command-line interface. This can be useful for quickly querying multiple domain names or troubleshooting DNS-related issues. To enter interactive mode in NSLookup in CMD, follow these steps:

  • In the Command Prompt window, type the following command and press Enter:
nslookup
  • NSLookup will enter interactive mode, displaying a prompt where you can enter additional commands and queries.

  • Type the domain name you want to query and press Enter to retrieve DNS information for that domain.

  • Repeat the process for additional queries, entering each domain name followed by pressing Enter.

10. Exiting NSLookup:

Once you've finished using NSLookup and retrieved the desired DNS information, you can exit the NSLookup session by typing the "exit" command at the NSLookup prompt and pressing Enter:

exit

This will exit NSLookup and return you to the regular Command Prompt interface.

https://m.youtube.com/shorts/VJ7jc6ISXXo

In summary, NSLookup is a powerful and versatile tool for querying the Domain Name System (DNS) and retrieving information about domain names, IP addresses, and other DNS records. By understanding the syntax and options available in NSLookup, you can effectively troubleshoot DNS-related issues, verify DNS configurations, and gather valuable information about network resources. Whether you're querying domain names, retrieving IP addresses, performing reverse DNS lookups, or troubleshooting DNS issues, NSLookup provides a flexible and reliable solution for network administrators, system administrators, and users alike.