How to enable administrator account with cmd

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Enabling the administrator account using the Command Prompt (CMD) is a useful troubleshooting step for Windows users, especially when the main administrator account is disabled or inaccessible. The administrator account provides elevated privileges and allows users to perform administrative tasks that are restricted to standard user accounts. In this guide, we'll explore various methods and techniques for enabling the administrator account using CMD, providing step-by-step instructions for each method.

1. Using CMD with Administrator Privileges:

Before attempting to enable the administrator account using CMD, it's important to open CMD with administrator privileges to ensure that you have the necessary permissions to make changes to system settings. To open CMD with administrator privileges, follow these steps:

  • Press the Windows key to open the Start menu.
  • Type "cmd" into the search bar.
  • Right-click on "Command Prompt" in the search results.
  • Select "Run as administrator" from the context menu.

2. Using the Net User Command:

One of the simplest methods for enabling the administrator account using CMD is by using the net user command, which allows you to manage user accounts from the command line. To enable the administrator account using the net user command, follow these steps:

  • In CMD with administrator privileges, type the following command and press Enter:
net user administrator /active:yes

This command activates the built-in administrator account and enables it for use.

3. Verifying the Status of the Administrator Account:

After enabling the administrator account using the net user command, it's important to verify that the account has been activated successfully. To do this, follow these steps:

  • In CMD with administrator privileges, type the following command and press Enter:
net user administrator

This command displays detailed information about the administrator account, including its status and privileges.

4. Using the Local Users and Groups Snap-in:

Another method for enabling the administrator account using CMD is by using the Local Users and Groups snap-in in the Microsoft Management Console (MMC). To enable the administrator account using the Local Users and Groups snap-in, follow these steps:

  • Press the Windows key + R to open the Run dialog box.
  • Type "lusrmgr.msc" into the Run dialog box and press Enter. This opens the Local Users and Groups snap-in.
  • In the left pane of the Local Users and Groups snap-in, click on "Users" to display a list of user accounts.
  • Right-click on the "Administrator" account in the right pane and select "Properties" from the context menu.
  • In the Properties window, uncheck the box next to "Account is disabled" and click "OK" to save the changes.

5. Editing the Registry:

If the administrator account is still disabled after using the net user command or the Local Users and Groups snap-in, you can enable it by editing the registry directly using CMD. To enable the administrator account by editing the registry, follow these steps:

  • In CMD with administrator privileges, type the following command and press Enter:
reg add HKLMSOFTWAREMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionPoliciesSystem /v LocalAccountTokenFilterPolicy /t REG_DWORD /d 1 /f

This command adds a registry key that allows remote administrative access to the local computer.

  • After running the command, restart your computer to apply the changes.

6. Enabling the Built-in Administrator Account on Windows 10:

On Windows 10 systems, the built-in administrator account is disabled by default for security reasons. However, you can enable it using CMD if needed. To enable the built-in administrator account on Windows 10 using CMD, follow these steps:

  • In CMD with administrator privileges, type the following command and press Enter:
net user administrator /active:yes

This command activates the built-in administrator account on Windows 10.

  • After enabling the built-in administrator account, you can sign out of your current user account and sign in using the newly enabled administrator account.

7. Using Safe Mode:

If you encounter difficulties enabling the administrator account using CMD in normal mode, you can try enabling it in Safe Mode, which starts Windows with a minimal set of drivers and services. To enable the administrator account in Safe Mode using CMD, follow these steps:

  • Restart your computer and repeatedly press the F8 key during startup to access the Advanced Boot Options menu.
  • Select "Safe Mode with Command Prompt" from the list of options and press Enter.
  • In CMD with administrator privileges, use one of the methods described above to enable the administrator account.

8. Using PowerShell:

Alternatively, you can use PowerShell, a more powerful command-line interface, to enable the administrator account. To enable the administrator account using PowerShell, follow these steps:

  • Open PowerShell with administrator privileges by right-clicking on the Start menu and selecting "Windows PowerShell (Admin)."
  • Type the following command and press Enter:
Enable-LocalUser -Name "Administrator"

This command enables the built-in administrator account on the local computer.

9. Creating a New Administrator Account:

If you're unable to enable the built-in administrator account using CMD, you can create a new administrator account instead. To create a new administrator account using CMD, follow these steps:

  • In CMD with administrator privileges, type the following command and press Enter:
net user username password /add

Replace "username" with the desired username for the new administrator account and "password" with the desired password.

  • After creating the new account, type the following command and press Enter to add the account to the administrators group:
net localgroup administrators username /add

Replace "username" with the username of the new administrator account.

10. Testing the Administrator Account:

After enabling the administrator account using CMD, it's important to test the account to ensure that it's working correctly. Sign out of your current user account and sign in using the newly enabled administrator account. Verify that you can access administrative tools and perform administrative tasks without encountering any errors or issues.

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In summary, enabling the administrator account using CMD is a useful troubleshooting step for Windows users, especially when the main administrator account is disabled or inaccessible. By using built-in tools like the net user command, the Local Users and Groups snap-in, and PowerShell, you can quickly and easily enable the administrator account and regain access to administrative privileges. Be sure to follow the appropriate steps and best practices for enabling the